London as you’ve never seen it

London as you’ve never seen it

Ever wondered what London would look like without people?   Take a look at these shoots taken last Saturday and Sunday on my permitted daily exercise.  Astonishing to see it and hear it, but hoping for a return to normality.   Thank you front line workers.  

A Mayfair pub walk

A Mayfair pub walk

Like me, you're probably hoping we get on the other side of this global pandemic soon!  Once we do, here is a pub-walk through one of London's most historical and well-heeled residential areas. Mayfair, named after its raucous annual fair, was purpose-built during the mid to late-1700's.   Many wealthly residents moved here from Soho - [...]

The Lambeth Workhouse that was home to Charlie Chaplin

The Lambeth Workhouse that was home to Charlie Chaplin

In 1896, Charlie Chaplin, his mother and brother presented themselves at the door of the Lambeth Workhouse in south London.   Charlie’s father had left them and with no secure earnings they were destitute.   Making matters worse, Charlie’s mother, Hannah, also suffered from mental problems.  Over the next few years, the family passed in, and out, [...]

St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul’s Cathedral

More than three hundred years after its completion, St Paul's Catherdral dominates the skyline on Ludgate Hill in the City of London.  Seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the British Commonwealth, it is the second largest domed church in the world (after St Peter's in Rome). The work of Sir [...]

Borough Market at dusk

Borough Market at dusk

Borough Market is one of London’s oldest markets, first mentioned in 1276.  This is owing to its position on the south side of London Bridge - the only bridge across the river until 1750, when Westminster Bridge opened.  Borough Market served travellers arriving or departing London from places to the south east of London, in [...]

Albert Bridge – ‘one of the beauties of the London river’

Albert Bridge in south west London, is one of the most attractive bridges crossing the River Thames.  It may not be as iconic as Tower Bridge downstream, but it’s actually older. Named in memory of Prince Albert, it provides access to Battersea Park which, disconcertingly for south Londoners today, was originally built for the wealthy [...]

The must-see exhibits at the British Museum (part 2)

The must-see exhibits at the British Museum (part 2)

Welcome to part two of the ‘Must-see exhibits at the British Museum'!    Part one, published recently, explored the ground floor galleries.    Part two starts in Room 61 and will work clockwise around the entire first floor. Room 61   Here we find artefacts from the tomb of a senior (and very successful!) ‘financial [...]

London’s last great ducal residence

London’s last great ducal residence

Syon House, near Brentford, is home of the Percys, Dukes of Northumberland.   It sits in a 200 acre estate on the River Thames in Middlesex. The house we see today was built by Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset in 1547, refurbished and enhanced by the Scottish architect Robert Adam in the 1760's and refaced in [...]

Charles Dickens’ London home – birthplace of his early novels

Charles Dickens’ London home – birthplace of his early novels

At the age of 25, Charles Dickens rented (as was normal practice of the day) a large home in Doughty Street, London.  He did this, just as his writing career (under the pseudonym of ‘Boz’) was taking off.  Dickens lived here happily with his wife, Catherine, and their three children. Charles and Catherine would go [...]

Hidden alleyways in the City of London

Hidden alleyways in the City of London

In the very heart of the City of London (the historic ‘square mile’) is a labyrinth of hidden alleyways connecting coffee houses, wine lodges, restaurants and churches.    If you’re visiting London, it’s a must-see! This short guide will direct you through the area.    You might lose your bearings but it’s relatively compact - [...]